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Date: 1702

Designer:
Philippe Grandjean / Bignon Commission

Foundry:
Imprimerie Nationale, France

Location:
Lyon, France

Current equivalent:
Royal Romain

See also:
Jaugeon, La Police BP

Technologies:
Metal (foundry)
Postscript
Opentype

Famous for:
The first 'neoclassical' typeface.

Applications: Prestige and Private Press

Ubiquity:
Very rarely used

Category:
Transitional Roman

Stress: Angled
Serif: Transitional

Design history:
With a grid-based rationality, vertical stress and balance, this type pre-figured Fournier's and Didot's designs. Punches for this type were cut by Phillipe Grandjean in response to Louis XIV's commission for a state typeface in the 1690s. Grandjean was directed by the government-appointed Committee Bignon, which included a two priests, an accountant and an engineer. The Romain du Roi was literally 'the kings roman'; the official type of the French state under Louis. Founded and cast by the Imprimerie Nationale of France, (the Imprimerie Royale before the revolution), the type was rigorously protected by law against unauthorised duplication.

profile 20

picture: Visual Communications