intro

how to

 

sizes

styles

purpose

a-z

map

timeline

 

list

links

glossary

search

Date: 1916

Designer:
Edward Johnston

Foundry:
London Underground / Stephenson, Blake

Location:
London and Sheffield, England

Current equivalent:
P22 London Underground

See also:
ITC Johnston Sans by Dave Farey, Agenda by Greg Thompson, Ministry by Rian Hughes, Bliss by Jeremy Tankard

Technologies:
Wood
Metal (foundry)
Photosetting
Postscript
Opentype

Famous for:
First corporate signage typeface for a metropolitan transport system.

Applications: Prestige and Private Press

Ubiquity:
Not widely used

Category:
Sans Serif Humanist

Stress: Vertical
Serifs: Sans

Design history:
A definitive humanist sans serif, Johnston's lettering was designed for signage rather than printing, which shows in the weight and the spacing of this type. Protected by law and unavailable to the general trade for many years, the type was redrawn and digitised as New Johnston – a related range of four weights with matching italics for London Underground in the 1980s. In the 1990s, Richard Kegler of P22 foundry negotiated with the London Transport Museum to produce a more faithful digital replica of the original type, now on sale in the museum and at the P22 website. It has two weights – the regular upper and lowercase and bold titling capitals, and a set of ornaments in the period style.

profile 36

picture: Capital Transport Pubs