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Date: 1966

Designer:
Adrian Frutiger

Foundry:
Linotype

Location:
Paris, France

Current equivalent:
Linotype OCR-A

See also:
OCR-B, OCR-C

Technologies:
Photosetting
Postscript
Opentype

Famous for:
First OCR typeface.

Applications: Multimedia and Onscreen

Ubiquity:
Very widely used

Category:
Monospaced Slab Serif

Stress: Vertical
Serif: Slab serif

Design history:
The world's first machine-readable typeface (OCR stands for Optical Character Recognition). Commissioned by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and designed to strict mathematical criteria. Adrian Frutiger worked with the assistance of the European Association of Computer Technicians, while attempting to keep the type overtly legible to humans as well. The result was an interesting trade-off between what computer-driven plotters were able to image, and what people required to tell one character from another. The type was made an international standard in 1973, and revised in 1977 to include a further 11 characters to match the ASCII character set.

profile 63

picture: Booth Clibborn Editions