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Date: 1932

Designer:
Stanley Morison / Victor Lardent

Foundry:
Monotype / Linotype

Location:
London, England

Current equivalent:
Linotype Times Roman

See also:
Times New Roman, Times MT PS, BT Dutch 801, FB Starling, Nimbus, English, Press Roman

Technologies:
Metal (foundry)
Metal (machine)
Photosetting
Instant lettering
Postscript
Opentype

Famous for:
First typeface designed as the house style of a newspaper.

Applications: Newspaper Publishing

Ubiquity:
Very widely used

Category:
20th Century Serif Roman

Stress: Angled
Serifs: Oblique

Design History:
Recognized as very English, and very establishment. 'Excogitated' by Morison (in his words) but drawn by Lardent, Times New Roman is described by Robert Bringhurst as having a humanist axis, mannerist proportions, baroque weight and neoclassical sharpness of finish. Designed for high economy, Times is a condensed text face modelled from the work of Christophe Plantin, a Dutch 16th century typefounder. Released to the trade after one year of proprietary use, its copyright is claimed by both Monotype and Linotype, despite its origin at the Times newspaper. Widely distributed as a default serif font with computer operating systems.

profile 15

picture: Yale University Press